Category Archives: Single Parenting

Five Helpful Parenting Tips For Single Parents

Child-rearing is unlike any other experience on earth. It brings unmatched rewards as well as difficult challenges. All single parents need help sometimes, or things can get overwhelming. While it is never simple, single parenting is a lot easier with a good support system and a few good tips. Here are five helpful parenting tips that you can put into practice today.

  1. Build A Support System

    Single parenting is a hard job, but you are not alone. Statistics reveal millions of single parents in America alone. Build your support system with the help of other parents at work, church, and in the schools. Many communities have single parent support groups, as well, so check the local newspapers and ask around.

  2. Follow A Routine

    Stability is important for all kids, especially those with single parents. Daily, weekly, and monthly routines help families better enjoy life together. They also create wonderful memories to draw on for years to come.

    Establish a daily dinner time, schedule a monthly matinee, review homework together, take family walks through the neighborhood, or enjoy Sunday picnics after church. Encourage your kids to participate in these memory-making activities.

  3. Eat Healthy And Creatively

    Many single parents turn to fast food, a quick and inexpensive way to do meals. But fast food does not benefit you or your children, and healthy eating will save time and money as well as health.

    Small food storage containers can hold cut fruit and vegetables, nuts, and other healthy snacks. Let your crock pot make a healthy meal for you and the kids, while everyone is at school and work.

  4. Take Care Of Yourself

    Kids learn best by example, so take an honest look at their primary role model: you. How is your physical, mental, and emotional health? Neglecting your own needs will model neglect in your kids’ lives, too.

    Eat healthy, get adequate rest, and find ways to relieve stress. Turn to your support system to share openly about your struggles. Ask a trusted friend to watch your kids for a while, so you can get away for some personal time.

  5. Combat Loneliness

    Not only is single parenting hard, it is a lonely business sometimes. Finding ways to combat the loneliness is essential. Start a household project or hobby, or contribute time to a volunteer organization. Reconnect with an old friend or classmate by phone or in-person.

    Or join the parents of your child’s friends for an informal get-together with the kids. Stay busy with fun, energetic activities that elevate your mood. And let them serve as reminders that you have the best job of all.

Single Parenting Help

Single parenting used to be somewhat rare in the USA, when the divorce rate was much lower – or practically nonexistent – and most Americans lived in settings with large extended families. Even if a parent was alone without a spouse for example, chances were that they had grandparents and aunts and uncles to help out with rearing the children. But these days there is a high likelihood that if you have a child, you are involved as their primary caregiver all by yourself.

In fact in the 21st century single parenting is practically the norm for Americans, and while that puts an additional load of responsibility on the single parent it has also inspired lots of single parent resources. We now have support groups and single parenting websites, for instance, and there are tons of great books and magazines with tips and advice for the single parent. There are some wonderful daycare facilities, nannies, and community organizations to help single parents and you should look into all of those available resources.

Seek these out, and also look for the company of other single parents in your community. But many parenting experts also advise that when you choose other parents to network with, you should do so selectively. You want to find parents with children about the same age as yours, for instance, and also those who are not going to try to compete with you as a parent but instead support you. Sometimes parents get really competitive in terms of the rapid development of their children or they are critical of the parenting philosophies of other single parents. You don’t need that kind of pressure, and so seek out and befriend other single parents with whom you have a comfortable and fun rapport.

Siblings can also be fantastic allies for single parents. So if you have other children that means even more parenting to do, but this can also become your most valuable source of single parent assistance. Plus while those older brothers and sisters pitch it to help you, they will automatically learn great lessons about sharing, responsibility, and more mature behavior.